Kitten Training – Guide For New Kitten Owners

One of the most attractive aspects of kittens is that they are undeniably cute. They are little furry bundles that beg to be stroked and played with, and all but the coldest of hearts cannot help but submit to their will. However, this cuteness soon wears thin after the first few times your kitten has used your living room as a toilet. If you allow this to continue it will not only cause your home to smell like a toilet, potentially embarrassing you in front of guests but could also harm your developing relationship with your young kitten.

One of the most attractive aspects of kittens is that they are undeniably cute. They are little furry bundles that beg to be stroked and played with, and all but the coldest of hearts cannot help but submit to their will. However, this cuteness soon wears thin after the first few times your kitten has used your living room as a toilet. If you allow this to continue it will not only cause your home to smell like a toilet, potentially embarrassing you in front of guests but could also harm your developing relationship with your young kitten.

How long does it take to train a kitten?

Kitten TrainingIt doesn’t have to be like that. Believe it or not, it is entirely possible to buy a kitten from a breeder, bring it home and never have a problem with it messing anywhere other than in its designated litter tray. Sounds good, doesn’t it? I have years of pet care experience and have raised a number of cats from kittens – I’ll share my experience with you below, however, I am not going to pretend that it will be easy. You will need a lot of patience and commitment but it will all be worth it in the end.

Luckily, we have nature on our side. Domestic cats are very good at keeping themselves clean through rigorous grooming and do not like to be messy. If you give them the opportunity to keep everything nice and clean then you can bet that they will take it. In fact, cats have a natural predisposition for visiting the same place every time they need to go to the toilet.

The first thing you need to do is to provide your kitten with a litter tray of a decent size. It is important that the tray is big enough for the cat to move about in a little. Cats and kittens will do their business and then try to bury it. If you have a very small litter tray then your cat may well simply kick its mess out onto your floor in an attempt to bury it. You should encourage burying as it will help to reduce the odor; to achieve this, as well as a large litter box, you will need to use a good amount of cat litter. It is important to clean the tray regularly but remember it is the odor that directs kittens back to the litter tray when they need to use the toilet, so for the first few days of training you must tolerate a little odor and/or be constantly on hand to direct a kitten to the designated area.

How long does it take to litter train a kitten?

To make litter emptying easier you will want to place the cat litter material on top of a base rather than putting it straight into the tray. A couple of layers of newspaper or junk mail are usually sufficient. Have a little bit of the newspaper overlapping each end of the tray, so that you can hold onto these edges and then lift the newspaper out into the trash, taking the soiled litter along with it.

Select the location of your kitten’s litter tray very carefully. It is extremely important that you do not move the tray once training is underway. This is because the kitten will return to the same spot every time it needs to go. It is the location of the tray rather than the tray itself that your pet remembers.

Kittens intended to become house cats will need a litter tray for their entire lives. However, outdoor cats will soon elect to use the great outdoors as their litter tray rather than the one you have provided – this is good as it will mean less work for you. It is probably best to wait until your cat is at least 6 months old and neutered before you allow it free access to the big wide world. After this period, you should keep your litter tray in place for a month after you notice that you cat has stopped using it. This will ensure no nasty accidents occur as a result of you removing the tray before the transition to the outdoors is fully complete.

Should any smelly accidents occur it is important not to reprimand your kitten too heavily. Simply pick it up as soon as you notice and let it complete its business in the tray. If you do not spot the mess until it is too late then it is important that you simply clean it up – it is too late to do anything to punish your kitten, it will not relate the negative reinforcement to its actions – the punishment will simply harm the relationship between you and your kitten. Instead, reward your kitten after every time you have noticed it use the tray but remember to give it privacy while it is actually going to the toilet. Otherwise, you may deter it from using that location.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *